Tag Archives: dry erase boards

Cheap and Easy (Dry Erase Boards in Your Classroom)

One of the learning tools I love to use the most is also one of my students’ favorites: dry erase boards.

Three years ago I bought a large 4′ x 8′ sheet of hardboard at Lowe’s for around $11.00. For a minimal fee they cut the board into 32 12″x 12″ boards. I think the total bill was less than $15.00. I purchased economy packs of wash cloths at Dollar General. While dry erase markers can be pricey, our team has them on the supply list (1 pack of 4 for each student). We put these markers in a huge basket and they are for general use in the classroom.

We use these boards almost every day in some capacity.

Any paper/pencil activity that can be put on the SMART Board can be done on a dry erase board. (Especially good for grammar, math problems, multiple choice activities, and fill in the blank type worksheets)

I have my students write an occasional short answer/extended response/journal entry on a dry erase board. I love when students ask if they can get another board because they don’t have room for everything they want to say.

I use them with our online textbook. It’s not very easy to get computer time in our building but by using the SMART Board and the dry erase markers, I can easily use tutorials, review activities, and vocabulary lessons with the whole class.

Dry erase boards are also a great way to do formative assessment. It’s very easy to get an overview of how well the students grasped the daily lesson.

So let me sum it up:

Pros of dry erase boards
+ Less paper/pencil tasks
+ Less photo copying and less waste
+ Allows for movement around the room (Sometimes they can sit on the back counter, the floor, away from their desks)
+ Accountability (“Everybody, boards UP!”)
+ Engaging (Everyone can answer every question, not just one student)
+ Forgiving (It’s easy to erase mistakes and try again)

Cons of dry erase boards
– Not practical for graded assignments
– Kids love to doodle. (I admit I am a “doodler”. You should see my decorated notes from staff meetings!)
– The markers stink! (I strongly recommend specifically putting low-odor markers on your supply list

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The pros clearly outweigh the cons.
(Artwork by my daughter)

On a Scale of 1 to 10

The last few days of school and the natives are restless.  Today in my Resource Language Arts class we did a fun culminating activity.

To begin, we looked at a worksheet about evaluating a piece of writing. We discussed what it means to evaluate, completed the worksheet, and then the students became the evaluators.

Students lined up along the back of the room with small dry erase boards.  Their job was to rate/evaluate each piece of literature that we read this year.  I started at the beginning of the year and went sequentially.  Students would write a number 1-10 (1 being the lowest) and then arrange themselves in a number line from lowest to highest.

My daughter modeling the activity.

As we went through our stories, I showed them the title pages or covers of each selection. This helped spark their memory.  (Note to self: Next year, put these on the SMART Board rather than awkwardly flip through the text book.)

To keep the activity educational, I did the following things at random:

I asked individual students to provide a reason for their rating. What made you rate this selection so low? What made this a perfect 10 for you?

I quizzed them over the plot, characters, and some of the literary terms we used when we read that piece of literature. What was the setting of The Tell-Tale Heart?  Which character was the protagonist in The Outsiders? What was Leo’s internal conflict in Stargirl?

I helped students find and explain the patterns of their ratings. Some things we noticed: The boys preferred science fiction and horror stories. Those who hate to read out loud rated the plays lower than the other types of literature.  Overall, students rated our novels (The Outsiders, Stargirl, and The Boy in the Striped Pajamas) higher than our short stories out of our literature book.

Allowing the students to stand and move was a great way to direct their energy at this crazy time of year.  I know some people use a number line already posted in their room, but the use of dry erase boards made everyone accountable and honestly, what student doesn’t love dry erase boards?

This activity was beneficial to me as well, as it served as a kind of formative assessment. What did they learn? What do they remember? What did they enjoy? What did they dislike?  This will help me in my planning and instruction next year.

Do you do any end of the year surveys or review games?

How would you change this activity to fit your class?
On a scale of 1 to 10, how was your year?

9.0

I’d give the 2011-12 school year a rating of 9.0
(Artwork by my 12-year-old daughter)

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