Tag Archives: text structure

Last Minute Language Arts Cram Session

A few weeks ago I learned about ThingLink, which is destined to become my new favorite thing.

With our Spring Break trip and adjusting to Ian’s new life on an insulin pump, I haven’t had much time to work with it.

But finally, the last few days I’ve been creating a review ThingLink for our 7th grade Language Arts students. I’ve connected it to many of my own Prezis and found some other resources as well. Every little icon you see will take you somewhere new!

Language Arts Review – Are you ready?

 

This image isn't live. You'll have to click the link above to discover all the goodies hidden behind the icons.

This image isn’t live. You’ll have to click the link above to discover all the goodies hidden behind the icons.

The Last Hurrah: Text Structure Review

To go along with my Prezi, I decided to create mini-lessons for the five text structures.

The plan was to spend one day on each, using the Prezi as an intro, taking notes in the Text Structure Flip Book I created, and then doing corresponding activities.

The activities took me a little longer than five days but ended up making a great unit.

I used many of the graphic organizers from a PDF I found online (Comprehension and Text Structure Graphic Organizers)

I also used many of the nonfiction reading selections from www.readworks.org.

Here are some highlights from each mini-lesson.

Descriptive

Students used a graphic organizer that really helped them think spatially as they described our classroom. I gave students the option of describing their bedroom if they wanted to.

Students completed this graphic organizer in class and then had to write their paragraph for homework.

Students completed this graphic organizer in class and then had to write their paragraph for homework.

 

Compare and Contrast

For this lesson students rotated in groups to three different stations. Each station had a nonfiction selection from ReadWorks.org.  I picked a variety of Lexiles and highlighted some text features like footnotes, headings, bold words, and captions.

At each station they had to record three details showing similarities and differences.

Overhead view of one group working hard on their graphic organizer.  I have no idea why a protractor was involved in this lesson.

Overhead view of one group working hard on their graphic organizer. I have no idea why a protractor was involved in this lesson.

I used the questions that come with the selections the following day as a review of test taking strategies on the SMART Board.

Cause and Effect

I used the cards and activity that begins on page 29.  I cut the cards and students picked one from the bag. They then wrote their “cause” statement on their paper. I played some music and students walked around until the music stopped. They plopped down and wrote one “effect” on the paper.  We repeated this process about 5 or 6 times and each time the students had to read all of the effects listed and come up with something different.  I loved the creativity of some of their responses and they loved walking around and writing on their classmates papers.

Cause and Effect cards pg. 30

Sequence or Process Writing

For sequence writing, I used three nonfiction selections spread out over a few days. We completed these individually just like we would the OAA – I read the directions and questions, they read the selection, and I repeated the directions (per their IEP accommodations).  This provided some practice and forced them to pay attention to detail and read headings.

sequence pg 57

Students used this organizer to write a paragraph about their morning routine.

Problem and Solution

I turned this mini-lesson into a speaking/listening/social skills lesson where students had to rotate with small groups to 6 different “problems.” For each problem they had to come up with a good solution and they had to use a signal word from the list on the Prezi in their response.   After reading some of their solutions, I realized we needed to work on some of our social skills so I will be coming back to this activity later this week.

Prob-Solution2

At least they said “please.”

Prob-Solution1

I was happy to see the vocabulary word “protest” in one of the solutions.

"You just suck it up and eat it"  is actually the best response.

“You just suck it up and eat it” is actually the best response.

The final activity was a matching activity and part of the PDF file.

Students can cut and paste and submit for a grade or they can just match them up on the table.

Students can cut and paste and submit for a grade or they can just match them up on the table.

Wow! That is a lot of information.  I hope I provided enough information to show the variety of the lessons.  The last thing I wanted to do was bore them with a bunch of worksheets but with the OAA coming up tomorrow I wanted to be sure to cover a lot.

And on THAT note….I should probably wrap this up and relax a little before the fun starts tomorrow! If you happen to be in Ohio, or are taking any sort of achievement tests this week….Good luck!  It’s all downhill from here!

Informational Text Organizers

Definitely not my favorite thing to teach, but a requirement of the Common Core. It is very challenging for me because I have to find informational text in a lower Lexile range (400-600) when my students should be reading at almost double that.

Here are a few things I made to go with the next chunk of non-fiction reading we are going to be doing in my Resource Room.

Non-Fiction Pre-Reading Sheet

Non-Fiction Glossary

Non-Fiction Diagrams and Captions

Non-Fiction Book Report

Non-Fiction Book Report 2

Non-Fiction Book Report 3

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